Pragmatism
   Indigenous shamanisms tend to disrupt the binary sacred–profane boundary imposed by Western observers, avoid transcendentalism, and embed practice in pragmatic day-to-day community (human and other-than-human) relations. The relationship between shamans and clientele among the Native American Gitxsan community of the Pacific Northwest offers a salient example: “The fees for doctoring might be ten blankets, prepaid, for each patient, or it might be as little as one blanket. But if the doctored person died afterwards, the blankets were returned” (“Listening to Our Ancestors: Native Art on the North Pacific Coast,” National Museum of the American Indian, Washington, D.C.).

Historical dictionary of shamanism. . 2007.

Look at other dictionaries:

  • Pragmatism — pragmatism …   Philosophy dictionary

  • Pragmatism — • As a tendency in philosophy, signifies the insistence on usefulness or practical consequences as a test of truth. Catholic Encyclopedia. Kevin Knight. 2006. Pragmatism     Pragmatism   …   Catholic encyclopedia

  • pragmatism — PRAGMATÍSM s.n. Curent filozofic idealist care, negând adevărul obiectiv, proclamă drept unic criteriu al adevărului numai ceea ce este util şi avantajos din punct de vedere practic. – fr. pragmatisme. Trimis de deka u, 05.08.2004. Sursa: DLRM … …   Dicționar Român

  • Pragmatism — Prag ma*tism, n. The quality or state of being pragmatic; in literature, the pragmatic, or philosophical, method. [1913 Webster] The narration of this apparently trifling circumstance belongs to the pragmatism of the history. A. Murphy. [1913… …   The Collaborative International Dictionary of English

  • pragmatism — I noun expedience, expediency, matter of factness, practical attitude, practicality, practicalness, rationality, realism, realistic attitude, realisticness, reasonableness, sensibility, sensibleness, sound thinking, unidealism, unsentimentality… …   Law dictionary

  • pragmatism — (n.) matter of fact treatment, 1825, from Gk. pragmat , stem of pragma (see PRAGMATIC (Cf. pragmatic)). As a philosophical doctrine, 1898, said to be from 1870s. Probably from Ger. Pragmatismus. As a political theory, from 1951. Related:… …   Etymology dictionary

  • pragmatism — ► NOUN 1) a pragmatic attitude or policy. 2) Philosophy an approach that evaluates theories or beliefs in terms of the success of their practical application. DERIVATIVES pragmatist noun …   English terms dictionary

  • pragmatism — [prag′mə tiz΄əm] n. 1. the quality or condition of being pragmatic ☆ 2. a method or tendency in philosophy, started by C. S. Peirce and William James, which determines the meaning and truth of all concepts by their practical consequences… …   English World dictionary

  • Pragmatism — This article is about the philosophical movement. For other uses, see Pragmatism (disambiguation). Pragmatism is a philosophical tradition centered on the linking of practice and theory. It describes a process where theory is extracted from… …   Wikipedia

  • pragmatism — pragmatistic, adj. /prag meuh tiz euhm/, n. 1. character or conduct that emphasizes practicality. 2. a philosophical movement or system having various forms, but generally stressing practical consequences as constituting the essential criterion… …   Universalium

  • pragmatism —    A distinctly American philosophy, pragmatism emerged in Charles Peirce s development and defence of pragmatic efficacy as a criterion for discerning the meaning of words. According to Peirce, meaning can be found in the conceivable effects… …   Christian Philosophy

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